Rosado

Rosado

Rosado, the Spanish word for rosé, comes in many different styles.

Most rosado wines are made when the skins of red grapes come into contact with the crushed juice for a short period of time (maceration).  The longer the contact, the darker the hue.

Rosados are generally meant to be fresh and light, designed to be consumed within the current vintage, making way for the next year’s bottling.   A select few wineries craft rosados that beneift from long cellaring.

Sparkling rosado wines are created by blending a small amount of red grapes with white grapes during the traditional and ancestral methods.

Then there’s clarete, a field blend of red and white grapes, co-fermented on its skins at the same time, the traditional way to produce wines in areas like the Ribera del Duero dating as far back as the 12th century.   Lighter wines meant to be matched with local cuisine, a style that is coming back in fashion, serious gastronomic wines.

There’s a style of rosado out there for every occasion.


14 artículos

14 artículos